Amazonite Earrings

What Kind Of Stone Is That? My Take On Turquoise, Amazonite and Howlite

As my jewelry has been evolving, so has my taste in materials. I am having fun mixing metals, soldering, riveting and the like. I’ve also changed many of my “splashes of color” from handmade artisan beads to gemstones – semi-precious, mostly. I bought myself two guides to identifying gemstones and am actually starting to recognize some at shows I go to.

As I become more interested in using copper in my work, I find myself reaching more for blue or green stones to pair with it. And I have started searching out turquoise, amazonite and howlite.

TURQUOISE natural turquoise is found in many parts of the world. In the U.S., there are (or were) several mines in the Nevada area where the turquoise is highly prized and can be quite pricey. I have several pieces (small) of Number 8 Turquoise from Eureka County, Nevada. This mine has no longer producing turquoise, but there is a reserve of it that is slowly being sold. Once this is gone, that’s it for this beautiful stone celebrated for the golden brown to black distinctive spider web matrix and its vivid blue color. Another mine – the Sleeping Beauty mine in Nevada – also produces highly collectible turquoise. Kingman Turquoise, from Arizona, has a deep, intense blue color. Dry Creek Turquoise is very rare – it is the palest turquoise in the world. In many cultures, turquoise is a holy stone, a bringer of good fortune or a talisman.

Something to keep in mind – there is a lot of man-made turquoise out there. Generally, a stone with a uniform color is not natural turquoise. Also – there is no such thing as purple turquoise. That is a stone that has been dyed or treated.

AMAZONITE  is found in the United States, Brazil, Zimbabwe, Russia, Australia, Namibia. It is usually light green to blue-green, mottled and sometimes contains light striations. It is sometimes confused with turquoise, but I find the green to be very distinctive. The more you see of it, I think you’ll agree. It reminds me of a color I might see in the Caribbean.

Amazonite Ring by fat dog beads

Top: Number 8 Turquoise
Center: Dyed Howlite
Bottom: Amazonite

According to legend, Amazonite is said to enhance creative expression and improve self-worth. Amazonite is considered a soothing stone that offers confidence is called the “hope stone” because it inspires confidence and hope. One source says it is useful to activate lazy teenagers. Not sure about that one!

Dyed Howlite Copper Pronged Ring by fat dog beads

HOWLITE is a soft, light mineral with a chalky white color that is very porous, and therefore easily dyed. In most cases, it is dyed light blue to resemble turquoise. It has been found in large quantities in California, and is reasonably priced.

According to some meditation forms that use crystals as focus points, undyed howlite can be an excellent means of concentration. Some believe it is highly stress relieving and is recommended as a means of quieting insomnia. Some crystal users suggest that the mineral helps balance calcium levels in the body, and acts as an absorbent for negative energy. It is also said to correspond with the Zodiac sign Gemini. Another source says, “place a howlite stone in your pocket to absorb your own anger – or another’s anger that is directed toward you. It helps to overcome critical or selfish behaviour.” All good stuff, right?

NOTE: be aware that some not-so-honest gemstone dealers DO try to palm off dyed Howlite as Turquoise.

Have you worked with any of these stones? Would love to see what you’ve created! Send pics!

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2 comments on “What Kind Of Stone Is That? My Take On Turquoise, Amazonite and Howlite

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